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For Kids Ages 4-9

Hands-on

Coding Robot 

Toy

Develops Cognitive Abilities, Imagination, And Coding Skills Through Hands-on Play

 

Get to Know Matatalab 

 

SCREENLESS

A more friendly way to learn fundamental coding concept at a very early age.

A physical way to learn abstract coding ideas.

WORDS FREE

The coding blocks is with intuitive graphical symbols on them.

Building confidence for kids to predict the movement of the robot as well as to test and confirm their reasoning.

GAME-BASED

With Matatalab, kids don’t feel like serious programming, they are just playing some maze game adventure, creating music or even drawing a picture which means something. It makes learning fun and engaging.

CODE TO PLAY ADVENTURE

kids are challenged to find different ways to meet the target.

As they progress from easy to advanced level, kids learn and use new coding concepts like sequence, loops, functions, etc. step by step.

Code to Play Music

Kids can compose their favorite music, or even create their own!

Code to Play Art

Kids can draw beautiful graphics and pictures through programming, towards the more advanced stages of coding their mathematical theories of geometry also improves.

WHAT PEOPLE SAY

“Child-friendly programming is one of the great educational tasks of this century. The coding robot from MatataLab is a milestone in realizing this task.”

—  Volker Bombien, German publisher, Bombini Verlags GmbH

“Colourful, creative, hands-on. MatataLab’s 'Coding like ABC' takes coding to kindergarten level. Using game-based, hands-on coding, even the youngest children can start developing an understanding for computing in the most playful way. This is a relevant step in supporting future coding talents from an early stage on.” 

—  Beate Jost,  Technical Manager at Open Roberta, Fraunhofer IAIS

“The most important value of the solution you are developing is the tactile learning that is involved and the modular growing complexity of the learning activities that a student can engage with while using your tools.”

—  Tommaso Dalla Vecchia, Future Classroom Lab, European Schoolnet